As mentioned, my first attempt at a Boston Qualifying Flying Pig was in 2018. That attempt ended week 10 with a nasty and relentless stabbing pain on the outside of my left calf and foot. When this first came on, I ignored it for a while. Then, when I few days later I found myself limping trying to walk to my kid’s school bus stop, I realised my body was trying to tell me something.

29790069_10156474386093900_2202518658851274752_n

I sincerely wanted to tell my body to “do one and get the *&&%” over it and quick.” I also wanted to cry. *I did cry, A LOT.

My coach friend told me not to panic, it sounded like tendons and that could be sorted with a couple of days rest. This would also not affect my training.

Cut forward 6 weeks, having been MRI’d , booted, x-rayed, ultra-sounded, physical “therapied”, all layered with a general feeling of loss, I find myself on the side lines of the Flying Pig cheering on my friends.

31950327_10156550039863900_6753588296296693760_n

Shortly after this, I did start to run again, slowly, low mileage. A month later the pain was pretty much gone. A few months after this, the Achilles tendon started to niggle.

All this I put down to my failure to truly honour recovery runs. I’d got faster and got over excited. I had listened to my coach (always!) but sort of defied him, thinking I was clever.   I now see 2018 as my running equivalent of “the difficult second album”. If I want to come back with this BQ in 2019, I need to listen.

So, since my last race (the fast half in October), I’ve been doing and will be doing the following:

  1. Running most of my runs at easy/recovery pace
  2. Seeing a chiropractor for deep tissue massage, cupping, realignment and ultrasound
  3. Going for a new shoe fitting
  4. Stretching before and after runs (yeah sorry, this is new)
  5. Foam rolling

IMG_9072

So, if this Pig is going to fly, it’s as ready as it will ever be.